STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

Number of replies: 89

Establishing Useful Norms for peer-to-peer feedback can be the difference between success and crazy-awesome success! Watch this Top 10 Peer Review Mistakes video, and peruse the following resources:

Peer-to-peer Feedback Criteria Examples

top 10 peer review mistake image to link to video


Peer_Assessed_Stamp.jpgShare your thoughts and ideas:

REMEMBER - the more you participate the more you get out of the discussions, so please try to respond to others as well.

  • Consider which peer feedback norms would be useful in your classroom?

  • Are different norms appropriate for different levels of students?

  • How might norms grow and change as students become more adept at peer-to-peer feedback?

  • How might students be involved in the creation and development of useful feedback norms?

  • How might giving students feedback on their feedback innovate your formative assessment practice?
In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Mary Ann Crow -

Be Kind

     Get to the Point  I like..., I think..., I believe that...

     NO:  Nice work, but...

Be Helpful (not repetitive/don't copy someone else's feedback/look for something else)

      Tell them WHAT they need to improve or fix.

BE specific - no general comments, DO NOT use "Nice job"

      Tell them exactly where the spelling errors or punctuation errors are, etc.

 

 

In reply to Mary Ann Crow

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Lisa Bauman -

I like this!  Simple and effective.

In reply to Lisa Bauman

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Melissa Cournia -

Agreed - If the feedback process is going to be done well, we don't need steps or norms that further complicate it. The complexity should come from the feedback process - keep the rest simple.

In reply to Mary Ann Crow

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Robert Graff -

and I like your 4th:  Be effective.

Make what you say able to be able to be helpful.

In reply to Mary Ann Crow

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Gina Phillips -

I like this shortened summary and feel it would be appropriate to give to students to norm peer to peer feedback. Thanks for the concise steps!

In reply to Mary Ann Crow

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Caitlin Bauer -

I really like how simple and specific this is. It really gets it down to the point, which is what kids need. 

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Scott Johnson -

I think selecting the more appropriate times for peer-to-peer feedback is vital.  At the high school level, students tend to be more focused on the completion of the process rather than the quality of feedback.  Some of that falls on my shoulders, but I think another aspect of that is that feedback activities are most effective when the student realizes its worth.  Sometimes they are disengaged with the opportunity to get feedback, which is why I suggest using it with a bit more sparingly than sometimes is done.

I think every feedback session I've experienced had some form of each of the characters from the video (although my colleagues were not quite as extreme) and managing that environment is difficult.  Maybe the progression as the year goes on is to establish a protocol (norms) that can be as simple as "what would Mr. Johnson think/write about this product" before turning in could be the most effective use.  We frequently do lab partners, where the expectation is that these types of conversations are being had - and both receive an equal grade on the product, which is justified in that both had equal opportunities for feedback and discussion to arrive at an acceptable response.  I wonder if an accountability aspect is something that could make the peer-to-peer more effective?  Not sure what that looks like in practice though, for not all feedback is worthy of revision.

In reply to Scott Johnson

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Whitney Spah -

Yes, they just want to get it done! I agree that selecting appropriate times for peer-peer feedback is vital. 

In reply to Scott Johnson

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Marcy Feickert -

I have to agree with you.  If the students don't have peer-to-peer feedback training, it will not be effective in the classroom.  At what level is this skill taught?  Who teaches it?  Is this skill used at every grade level?

In reply to Scott Johnson

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Melissa Cournia -

I really liked the rubric tool provided for accountability. Students couldn't even first assess themselves. As the year progressed maybe the rubric wouldn't be necessary anymore.

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Rosann Jacobs Fode -

Peer feedback, in my experience, has hinged on me. There has to be clear guidelines for the students, a rubric or something like it to focus students so it doesn't turn into a "Good Job!" party.

In reply to Rosann Jacobs Fode

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Whitney Spah -

I agree. I feel students can still be apart of the process by allowing them to create some norms.  As a class I would be willing to try having students create a rubric or revise one.  The good job comment just is a kick in the face if you truly have worked your butt off on an assignment. 

 

In reply to Whitney Spah

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Brittany Christenson -

I agree a rubric helps exponentially.

Students also tread lightly when giving peers feedback in order to avoid hurt feelings. A rubric can help with this and guide students toward a more detailed evaluation.

In reply to Rosann Jacobs Fode

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Stephanie Holtz -

It is a total shift of thinking for students - it's so easy to just say "good job" and be done and continue with your own work. I think this is where we as teachers need to often state the purpose of peer feedback and give examples - the Rise Model poster or something similar may be helpful. 

In reply to Stephanie Holtz

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Rhiannon Reems -

I agree. Although it may take a little time to establish norms and look at examples of appropriate student feedback, I believe it will be well worth it in the end.

In reply to Rhiannon Reems

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Melissa Cournia -

Agreed - go slow to go fast. I've taken half a class period to teach giving feedback. A student stands with his back to the garbage can and tries to toss in a ball without looking - his peers give him feedback until he makes it. We then brainstorm how feedback can help and also be unhelpful. It's a very concrete activity we can refer back to all year about how to give helpful feedback. 

In reply to Melissa Cournia

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Caitlin Bauer -

That's an awesome idea! It really helps put it in perspective for kids and gives them a good idea of what valuable feedback can do. 

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Reagan Urbanec -

The successful implementation of peer to peer feedback fundamentally comes down to classroom management and classroom environment. Students need to feel safe to be honest but they also need to be given the tools and be shown/taught how to give valuable feedback. This isn't something, I believe, that can be done on day one of the new school year. It's an entire shift in teaching practice - if it's to be done right.

In reply to Reagan Urbanec

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Anne Volk -

I agree with you on this Reagan. That safe environment needs to be created; switching teachers and students at semester can impede this at the beginning of a new semester as well as the beginning of the year, which you stated.

In reply to Anne Volk

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Cory Volk -

Keeping the same teacher for all classes within a discipline is a huge asset at SCHS.  I find a much higher course completion rate for students that have previously had a class with me over students that are new to my classroom.

In reply to Reagan Urbanec

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Laine Beyer -

I also think you make a good point. Starting small and working up to giving quality feedback needs to be taught and practiced.

In reply to Reagan Urbanec

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Marcy Feickert -

I agree.  At what grade level is peer-to-peer review taught?

In reply to Marcy Feickert

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Kathleen Skibicki -

Good question!!  I think it is something that has to be taught and modeled. If it isn't I really think that the feedback will not play a vital role in the learning.

 

In reply to Reagan Urbanec

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Pamela Vukelic -

I strongly agree with your comment relative to classroom management and classroom environment. And, I agree this cannot be done on day one. This happens as students become acclimated to your environment and your clearly articulated expectations in terms of respect for one another. 

In reply to Reagan Urbanec

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Melissa Cournia -

This was also my first response when reading about peer-to-peer feedback. First, we need to establish a safe classroom environment, trusting relationships, and an atmosphere of collaboration and risk-taking. Second, we need to get students on both ends of this feedback to buy-in. I notice that my middle schoolers don't want to be mean, so I've started explaining to them that they're actually being mean when they don't give their peers specific feedback because you're not helping them learn and grow. Quality feedback is a sign of a respectful relationship.

In reply to Reagan Urbanec

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Gina Phillips -

I very much agree with you Reagan about allowing the students an environment where they feel respected so that honest feedback can be given. Some of the other comments about giving it time - there will be incremental steps throughout the semester to get to the point where the feedback hits as many of the 7 keys as possible!

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Whitney Spah -

I really like the RISE model and will look into setting up some norms or developing a rubric that would correlate to Physical Education.  

I really want to use more peer-peer assessment in my class on a daily basis.  I feel students are very defensive when it comes to constructive feedback in PE class. Often I get the defensive kid or the kid who doesn't like sports anyways so the motivation can be very low.   I teach a class where students perform in front of an audience daily.  I want to involve my students in setting up the norms because it creates a culture that may give students confidence. It is a teaching shift, it can be done by students practicing the norms they have created and practicing giving feedback that is valuable to their partners. 

In reply to Whitney Spah

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Lisa Bauman -

We are lucky in 6th grade because we have a standard that asseses their ability to give and receive feedback.  We have to practice it a lot and they are a little more moldable at this age.  Peer feedback really does work well with a well defined rubric.

In reply to Lisa Bauman

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Pamela Vukelic -

It is good to know this is something sixth graders are exposed to!

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Stephanie Holtz -

I do a lot of peer feedback when students are writing. This generally occurs when students are editing and revising their papers. The students generally pick a partner to peer edit with and this person isn't always a friend but rather a peer who is in the same spot in the writing process.

The Rise Model looks very interesting - I am going to make a poster of this and discuss possible sentence examples to use when giving peer feedback. I do this but I forget to review often, I do a good job of giving reminders the first couple of times we give peer feedback but I think I need to remind students of things to comment on more often. 

In reply to Stephanie Holtz

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Kathleen Skibicki -

I really like the RISE model too!!  I am looking forward to trying this too.  Anxious to see your poster!! :)

 

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Erin Hehr -

I have found success by giving students a detailed checklist.  We move as a class to each step of the checklist to avoid 'speedy sam' students.  This seemed to give all students adequate time to be specific about the task on the checklist. 

In reply to Erin Hehr

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Andee Adams-Woodmansee -

I really like this idea of the checklist. It would really help students to stay on task during the feedback process.

In reply to Andee Adams-Woodmansee

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Susie Brynjolfson -

I like this too Andee.  It is simple, but yet effective.  It is something that would be easy enough for students to pull out and use over and over.

In reply to Erin Hehr

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Anne Volk -

This is a nice idea Erin. I would love to get a copy of some of your detailed lists if they are universal. 

I have taken the rubric and revamped it by using each area of the rubric as a part of the feedback checklist. It is amazing how presenting the rubric in this fashion helps them really evaluate their partner's and their own work.

In reply to Erin Hehr

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Elizabeth Kappel -

The checklist and moving along as a class is a great idea.  So often students just want to get done or don't want to provide what they see as negative feedback and thus simply skim through steps or give each other a pat on the back and say good job which isn't helpful. I think using a checklist with the rise model (whether peer review or self reflection) would help make the process more meaningful. 

In reply to Erin Hehr

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Dayna Zins -

I agree a checklist is very helpful, I still find myself close to those who just "check things off" without giving the feedback a lot of thought.  Students are used to rubrics, maybe that is the key...

In reply to Erin Hehr

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Marcy Feickert -

I like the idea of a checklist.  I find it difficult to have the time to do this all the time in math.  Maybe if I show this video to my students it will help them in my class.

In reply to Erin Hehr

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Melissa Cournia -

A checklist is powerful especially at the beginning of students learning this process. I've noticed that as they get better at the feedback process, the less tools they need to be successful and the feedback becomes more authentic and purposeful. 

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Laura Wagner -

I would really like to develop a plan for training my students to give good feedback, and I am intrigued by creating a rubric for student's feedback to each other (and a method for me to give students feedback on their feedback). I'd like to combine this feedback training with specific goals for the students to provide peer feedback on in a loop throughout a writing unit. 

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Cara Emerson -

I liked the ideas of being kind, being detailed, staying focused.  In my experience, I have had to give a very detailed lists for students to follow.  I have also modeled what I expected.  Without giving good support, direction, and examples of how to this, kids won't do well.  

 

If you allow students to help develop the norms, I think it will help them internalize the importance of the review process.  

 

If students can become successful at peer reviews, they are going to expect more from our feedback as well.  We can learn from our students.  

In reply to Cara Emerson

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Robin Jossart -

Although peer to peer feedback discussion is excellent for writing, I feel it has a real value in the science classroom.  In summer biology all three classes are doing individual science projects that are due at the end of the course.  It would be an excellent opportunity to have the students complete a few peer to peer discussions to help each other be successful.  A list is essential to help the students stay on track and being kind will be the top priority.

In reply to Robin Jossart

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Robert Graff -

Oh yes.  It will save me time, but I think so much about what we're learning about how the kids have to reflect on their own learning to understand their learning--it seems like an idea I'm going to try much more of.

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Megan Sletten -

Certainly my feedback should always be specific, kind, and helpful! I can imagine that norming feedback heavy on the front end could benefit us all in the end. 

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Bradley Townsend -

Having norms for feedback allows for more productive feedback. It helps student better interact with their peers in the learning process.

In reply to Bradley Townsend

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Cory Volk -

I agree that norms set a framework in which students know how to properly interact in the classroom and they get more out of the work.

In reply to Bradley Townsend

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Margaret Townsend -

There are lots of great norms and protocols for feedback at the National School Reform Faculty website.  

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Mark Lardy -

A lot of interested material about feedback.  I think that most important thing is that it needs to be specific.  The part I struggle with is finding the time to give good specific feedback.

In reply to Mark Lardy

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Anne Volk -

I agree. Time is such a huge factor! Leveraging students and peer to peer feedback is one way to help teachers survive. 

In reply to Mark Lardy

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Becky Davis -

Time is also my biggest obstacle! That and making it meaningful and specific to students. I need to get out of the rut of saying the same things over and over as feedback!

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Vanessa DeCoteau -

I totally agree with all of those who stated that providing effective feedback needs to be taught.  It might me taking a little more time in the beginning, but it will be more beneficial throughout the entire process.

Even though I teach mostly seniors I think that keeping it simple can work well.  I like the Be Kind, Be Helpful, Be Specific model.  As the year progress you could increase the complexity if you wanted/needed.

To be totally honest, I am kind of struggling to see how I would use this more than twice in a semester.  I can think of two projects off of the top of my head that I can see this working well with.  Like Scott mentioned in a different forum, with my course a lot if it is either right or wrong.

In reply to Vanessa DeCoteau

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Melissa Davis -

Maybe in a class that has a lot of write and wrong answers part of the feedback process and practice could include student feedback on where the concept went wrong or what errors were present in thinking that caused something to be write or wrong.  

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Jane Wolf -

Feedback norms should change throughout the year as students grow and become better at providing feedback. This change is proof of student growth.  Students need to be taught how to provide beneficial feedback.   2 stars and a wish may be good to use at the beginning of the year, but with growth, this can change.

In reply to Jane Wolf

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Brittany Christenson -

I agree that peer feedback should start out more structured and then evolve throughout the year as students grow and become accustomed to the practice. Well said!

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Matthew Bohrer -

In order to use peer to peer feedback I think that you need lots of practice.  It will look different at the beginning of the year and maybe even take less time once the common practice is established. I feel that this is hard to implement in a math classroom because of efficiency issues.  The one area that it might apply best is when working with story problems.

In reply to Matthew Bohrer

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Kelly Schettler -

I completely agree. Peer feedback is something that needs to be practiced so that students can give helpful and effective feedback. I also struggle with how this fits into my math classroom. Peer feedback might be helpful in the process of students showing their work. 

In reply to Kelly Schettler

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Jocelyn Wax -

I agree! A lot of practice is needed. I hope to implement more practice this year. 

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Kerri Townsend -

I really liked the idea of "Two Stars and a Wish".  I think this will help students be motivated as it is short and to the point.  I know my daughter hates peer-to-peer feedback in classes because she usually ends up with someone who doesn't care or who is overly critical.  I think giving specific requirements for the feedback is necessary for kids. 

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Wade Curren -

I believe that to have quality peer-to-peer feedback requires having established norms and excellent classroom management skills.  If you want the peer-to-peer feedback to be valuable, you need to take the time to teach your students how it should and should not be done.  The resources provided are excellent starting points and something that I will incorporate in the coming school year.

In reply to Wade Curren

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Becky Davis -

I agree! If you want meaningful outcomes, you have to teach students what that looks like! It will take some time but it will be time well spent.

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Tamara Tufte -

I have been reading through some of the responses within this section.  I think it is clear that different levels of students require different ways/forms of peer editing.  Regardless of the age, however, I believe peer feedback needs to be taught and then guided in the beginning stages.  I like the idea of the ladder or rise guide for feedback. It is a clear path for students to take while trying to provide feedback that contains keys to effective feedback. 

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Rani Nelson -

I think the video does a great job of pointing out what not to do in any peer feedback discussion.  

I like keeping the norms for peer feedback simple, be respectful, be helpful, be specific, and be effective.  From there I think the students can help in developing what goes under each of these categories and help in the development of the norms they will be using for peer feedback.

I think the norms of peer feedback can stay the same for all levels but the type of work that you are providing feedback on will obviously change based on the level of the students.  The expectations the teacher sets will also change based on the level of the students and how comfortable they are with the norms and how to provide good peer feedback.

No matter what norms you use in the classroom, I think it is important to model how peer feedback works and what it should look like for your students through the feedback I provide as a teacher.  

 

In reply to Rani Nelson

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Mary Ann Crow -

Thank you for adding "Effective" to the steps - hope you don't mind if I borrow that!

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Robert Graff -

I could definitely see using peer-to-peer feedback and I know that I would have to teach it purposely and specifically to the students.  

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Brittany Christenson -

I would like to try coming up with a collective set of peer feedback norms as a class before we tackle any sort of peer editing or feedback. Students always seem to adhere better to an action plan that they took part in creating. I think that a clear set of objectives (I cans), student-friendly rubric or checklist, and student generated set of norms would set the stage for some great feedback and reflective learning experiences. I will definitely try this in the upcoming year.

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Kristine Montgomery -

The Ladder of Feedback would work very well in my classroom.  Having clear guidelines would help students make comments with purpose.  I have found that when students are focused on certain areas, they are more successful because their job becomes apparent. 

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Melissa Davis -

Student participation in feedback will help students individually and as a class better understand the value of feedback and increase their own willingness to accept feedback.  I think students can create these norms through modeling good feedback practices for one another.  Good feedback practices should include modeling feedback to one another.  

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Sara Rinas -

I believe peer-to-peer feedback is an good option for providing feedback to students in a timely manner.  In in order for this to be effective though we as teachers must model effective feedback and always monitor the process.  It is important for students to understand the expectations, therefore guidelines and rubrics for feedback are necessary before starting the process at any age level. It may be useful to provide students simple strategies for providing feedback.  As they become more familiar with process, more advanced strategies such RISE could be implemented.  Also in time, as students become more familiar with the process, I absolutely believe the should be participate in developing norms.  Before the assignment begins they are aware of the expectations based on the norms they have developed.  Evaluating peer work and providing feedback also gives students an opportunity to compare and evaluate their own work.  Students can ask themselves, "does my work meet the feedback I am providing to my peer?" 

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Erin Frankeberger -

I really liked the guidelines to Peer Feedback. It was great to see the to do's and the don'ts of Peer feedback. Often times the students feedback is very blah or not in depth at all.  I really like the detail it gives students.

 

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Pamela Vukelic -

 

Using models, as described in Strategies to Enhance Peer Feedback, would be very effective for projects. 

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Stacy Carufel -

While working with students in a class especially designed for struggling learners, I find it at times difficult for them to provide helpful peer to peer feedback to others regarding content. I am not sure how to combat this in an effective manner. This is a simple video that provides helpful tips for me when giving feedback! :)

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Wendy Hafner-Bakken -

Giving feedback instead of advice is a must in order for it to be useful to students. Involving the students in the development and implementation of how feedback will happen in the classroom is beneficial. Asking if they have some ideas about how to improve their work. It must be timely, ongoing and consistent.

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Rachel Jungling -

I think the idea of giving students feedback on their feedback could really pay off for everyone. If students are receiving better feedback they can create better work and if they can give themselves great feedback, this can happen much faster than a teacher meeting one-on-one with each student. The more I learn about this, the more I want to spend quality time teaching my students about what good feedback looks like. 

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Deleted user -

I think one of the biggest hurdles to jump over in regard to peer feedback is training students to know enough about their own work/thinking to be constructively critical of others, which takes lots of metacognition and self-reflection of what works best for each student individually. It is a process that takes the whole year for students to reap the benefits of learning how they/others learn.

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Jessica Bentz -

Since my students typically work collaboratively towards our learning targets, I always make it a point to establish norms of peer-to-peer feedback in my classroom.  We have a discussion of the difference between criticism and constructive criticism.  I give a few examples, and though they think it's silly as I give criticising examples, the expectation is that we are all mindful that we are all learners and we need to be sensitive in the way we deliver our thoughts.  I stress that criticism is hurtful while offering constructive criticism involves both positive and correctional comments in a friendly manner to improve the outcome.  

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Kimberly Hertz -

In the lab when students create recipes in a challenge situation, they get to taste each others work and they must leave specific comments when analyzing the food.  I feel this is very beneficial because, if you like it, you have to state what you like.  If you don' t like it, you have to state what you don't like.  The focus is always on the product and we go over what "valuable" feedback would sound/look like.

In reply to Kimberly Hertz

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Cory Volk -

It's good that you focus on the food and not the cook.  I know I got critiqued the other night for not getting the crust crispy enough on a pizza and I took it personally and if I were a student I would have shut it down for the day.

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Melissa Ringgenberg -

Wonderful examples that could be used in a variety of assignments, however, when analyzing which method I would use most, the model approach would probably be my #1.  Students are able to view other lab group products and compare to their own.  They can analyze and discuss the differences, therefore, reviewing what went well and what could be improved on.

I think in order to be effective, students need to be trained on how the process works.  As they become comfortable with it, it naturally flows and takes little "formal" time.

Many times when students are assessing other's work, it lends to great learning.  They are able to see other's mistakes, therefore, hopefully preventing them from doing the same.  It is a win-win all around!

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Thomas Bushaw -

I have struggled with Peer to Peer feedback for a long time. Students need to be vested in what they're doing and need to feel feedback is given with trust between the individuals. If you don't have these two things, peer to peer feedback becomes another task in the process, not a valuable tool for revision and growth. Tools like rubrics good examples of student work have helped my students in the past. A Big factor with history is giving kids ample and intensive focused time for review. Also, assuring that they understand the goals and objectives of the project, lab, etc. I have had students create rubrics for their assessment of their learning and have found it to be a useful tool. Kids need guidance in this process and teachers need a willingness to let them fail in some areas, but student really learn a lot from this process and show growth. 

In reply to First post

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Melissa Cournia -

I think it's important that as the year progresses and students get better at this feedback process that they start to move beyond just specific compliments and critiques to the higher end of RISE - suggest and elevate. Don't just say they need to improve their word choice, show them where and how you would do it, i.e. you should use more specific, active verbs in this part right here like _____. We learn best when we are able to teach the concept, so when a student suggests and elevates, both students are actually growing.

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Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Andrea Frantz -

Be direct and meaningful with your feedback, model expectations and make a connection with the student you are giving feedback to. 

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Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Melissa Schmitt -

Effective - Direct - Accountable - specific - authentic and necessary

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Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Alisha Gerving -

I believe that feedback needs to be effective and it needs to be necessary. Sometimes we give feedback when it is not needed and this can frustrate students. Students should be able to change and grow from your feedback!

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Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Stephen Townsend -

I am most excited about this new learning for me and my students.  I am excited about using peer feedback in the engineering process to allow students to help each other get better as well as improve their own understanding of the process.  This is fantastic information and tools to help me implement peer feedback.  

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Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Kalli Swenson -

I like both the Ladder Feedback (its structured for students to follow) and 2 Stars and a Wish. 

I thought the idea of the Thinking Hats was a cute concept, but I have concerns about students focusing on only one area of someone's work (particularly if they are the Black Hat the entire time). However, I may still use the concept of Thinking Hats in my classroom, but in a different form when we discuss careers and community actions. 

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Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Robin Nein -

I like the RISE feedback style as it is more simple and would be useful for projects or writing assessments.  I prefer a set of norms and a rubric guide for peer to peer feedback.  I believe a simple approach is to do a like and a wonder.... students should be specific and kind in both approaches.  I like how you connected the term to a real life scenario.  I wonder if you could be more specific in your presentation of the term _______ as it is incorrect in this situation.  

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Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Amanda Tomlinson -

I have used peer to peer feedback in my classroom often.  However, I have mostly used to make sure students are meeting the expectations set forth on the assignment.  I have struggled with how to make the feedback process more meaningful for students in order to achieve deeper learning. 

 

I think I will be able to bring some elements of the Student- Centered Assessment practices into my classroom.  I really like the checklist that was provided with the steps for feedback as well as the Ladder of feedback.  

 

I agree with many others that the key to doing this successfully is to work on this from day 1 in the classroom.  

In reply to Amanda Tomlinson

Re: STEP 5: Peer-to-Peer Feedback Discussion

by Jocelyn Wax -

I agree, Amanda! I think I am going to try the two stars and a wish when implementing peer to peer feedback. I like the simplicity of it.