3rd Grade English


All categories

Page:  1  2  3  4  5  6  (Next)
  ALL

PRIORITIZED STANDARDS

ELA-03.L

BPSS-ELA logoStrand (L)

Language

Narrative for the Language Strand:

As they move through formal schooling, students must gain control over the many conventions of standard English grammar, usage, and mechanics. They must also learn various ways to convey meaning effectively. Language standards include the rules of standard written and spoken English as well as the use of language as craft and informed choice among alternatives.  Third grade students gain control over proper use of pronouns, adjectives, adverbs, and other parts of speech, produce simple, compound, and complex sentences, and demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

English grammar conventions, knowledge of language, and vocabulary extend across reading, writing, speaking, and listening and, in fact, are inseparable from these contexts. As students grow in their understanding of patterns of English grammar, they can use this knowledge to make more purposeful and effective choices in their writing and speaking and more accurate and rich interpretations in their speaking and listening.

 

How to help your child with the standards in the Language Strand:

  • Engage your child in conversations every day. If possible, include new and interesting words in your conversation.
  • When coming across unknown words, encourage your child to use diagramslabels or reference materials (glossaries, dictionaries....) to find out what the definition is
  • Encourage your child to read on his own. The more children read, the more words they encounter and learn.
  • Encourage your child to "bump up" the vocabulary words they use in their writing.  Help them by finding synonyms for simple words (using enormous instead of the word big)

Resources

Calculation Method for Strands

Strands are larger groups of related standards. The Strand Grade is a calculation of all the related standards. Click on the standard name below each strand to access the learning targets and proficiency scales for each strand's related standards.


ELA-03.L.02

ELA Language Strand Logo 3rd (ELA) Targeted Standard
(L) Strand: Language
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English

ELA-03.L.02 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

Sub-Standards:

Introduce:
a. Use commas and quotation marks in dialogue.
b. Form and use possessives.
c. Add prefixes and suffixes to base words (e.g., sitting, smiled, cries, happiness).
d. Use commas and quotation marks to mark direct speech and quotations from a text.
e. Use a comma before a coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence.
f. Use punctuation to separate items in a series.
g. Use a comma to separate an introductory element from the rest of a sentence.
h. Use a comma to set off the words yes and no (e.g., Yes, thank you), to set off a tag question from the rest of the sentence (e.g., It’s true, isn’t it?) and to indicate direct address (e.g., Is that you, Steve?).
i. Use underlining, quotation marks, or italics to indicate titles of works.
j. Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed and/or using spelling patterns and generalizations (e.g., word families, position-based spelling, syllable patterns, ending rules, meaningful word parts).

Display proficiency in:
k. Use commas in greetings and closings of letters.
l. Use an apostrophe to form contractions and frequently occurring possessives.
m. Generalize learned spelling patterns when writing words (e.g., cage → badge; boy → boil).
n. Use commas in addresses.
o. Use conventional spelling for high-frequency and other studied words.

Student Learning Targets:

Knowledge Targets

  • I can identify words in a title that should be capitalized. 
  • I can name ending punctuation and how and when to use it. 
  • I can identify when a comma should be used in a sentence.

Reasoning Targets

  • I can 

Skills (Performance) Targets

  • I can punctuate dialogue correctly by using commas before/after speaker tags and placing quotation marks around spoken words (examples: "I was walking," Rob said, When Caleb tripped me.").
  • I can spell high frequency words correctly. 
  • I can write words correctly using common spelling patterns and generalizations.
  • I can consult reference material (dictionaries) as needed to check correct spellings. 
  • I can use periods, question and exclamation marks at the end of sentences. 
  • I can use commas to separate items in a list, city and state and in dialogue.

Proficiency Scale

The Student can ...
1 Beginning
... with help, demonstrates a partial understanding of some of the simpler details and processes (Score 2.0 content) and some of the more complex ideas and processes (Score 3.0 content).
Start

2 Developing
... demonstrates no major errors or omissions regarding the simpler details and processes but exhibits major errors or omissions regarding the more complex ideas and processes (Score 3.0 content).
  • recognize or recall specific terminology, such as:
    • possessive, proper noun, contractions, comma, apostrophe
  • perform basic processes, such as:
    • (2.L.2.p, u) capitalize proper nouns (dates, names of people, holidays, product names, and geographic names)
    • (2.L.2.v) capitalize important words in titles
    • (2.L.2.q) use end punctuation for sentences.
    • (2.L.2.r) use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series.

3 Proficient
“The Standard.”
... demonstrates no major errors or omissions regarding any of the information and processes that were end of instruction expectations.
  • Display proficiency using the following conventions in various writing activities:
    • (k) Use commas in greetings and closings of letters.
    • (l) Use an apostrophe to form contractions and frequently occurring possessives.
    • (m) Generalize learned spelling patterns when writing words (e.g., cage → badge; boy → boil).
    • (n) Use commas in addresses.
    • (o) Use conventional spelling for high-frequency and other studied words

4 Advanced
... demonstrates in-depth inferences and applications regarding more complex material that go beyond end of instruction expectations.
  • Demonstrates use of some of the following conventions in their writing:
    • Use commas and quotation marks in dialogue.
    • Form and use possessives.
    • Add prefixes and suffixes to base words (e.g., sitting, smiled, cries, happiness).
    • Use commas and quotation marks to mark direct speech and quotations from a text.
    • Use a comma before a coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence.
    • Use punctuation to separate items in a series.
    • Use a comma to separate an introductory element from the rest of a sentence.
    • Use a comma to set off the words yes and no (e.g., Yes, thank you), to set off a tag question from the rest of the sentence (e.g., It’s true, isn’t it?) and to indicate direct address (e.g., Is that you, Steve?).
    • Use underlining, quotation marks, or italics to indicate titles of works.
    • Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed and/or using spelling patterns and generalizations (e.g., word families, position-based spelling, syllable patterns, ending rules, meaningful word parts).

Teacher Proficiency Scale

Scoring Rubric

Score   Description Sample Activity
4.0

The student:

  • Makes no errors in capitalization, punctuation or spelling
  • The writing piece is exceptionally easy to read
The student may write about the same topics, but the writing conventions of capitalization, punctuation and spelling are advanced according to the indicators for a Level 4.
  3.5 In addition to Score 3.0 performance, the student demonstrates in-depth inferences and applications regarding the more complex content with partial success.
3.0

“The Standard.”  The student:

  • Makes minimal errors in grade appropriate capitalization, punctuation and spelling
  • The writing piece is easy to read
The student publishes (will be read by an outside audience) a writing piece (opinion, informative or narrative).
  2.5 No major errors or emissions regarding 2.0 content and partial knowledge of the 3.0 content.
2.0

The student:

  • Makes some errors in capitalization, punctuation and spelling
  • The errors made in conventions are noticeable and interrupt the flow of the piece
See Level 3 for example of task.
  1.5 In addition to 1.0 content, student has partial knowledge of the 2.0 content.
1.0

The student:

  • Makes many errors in capitalization, punctuation and spelling
  • The errors are noticeable and greatly interrupt the flow of the piece
See Level 3 for example of task.
  0.5 Limited or no understanding of the skill is demonstrated.

Resources

Vocabulary

  • Title
  • Dialogue
  • Speaker
  • Exclamation Mark
  • Quotations
  • Capitalize
  • Period
  • Comma
  • Question Mark
  • High-frequency word
  • Spelling Pattern
  • Base word
  • Prefix/Suffix

Websites

  • Links to sites that open in a new window
  • Scholastic


ELA-03.RF

BPSS-ELA logoStrand (RF)

Reading Foundations

Narrative for the Reading Foundations Strand:

The foundational skill standards are directed toward fostering students’ understanding and working knowledge of concepts of print, the alphabetic principle, and other basic conventions of the English writing system. These foundational skills are not an end in and of themselves; rather, they are necessary and important components of an effective, comprehensive reading program designed to develop proficient readers with the capacity to comprehend texts across a range of types and disciplines.  

Phonics:  In third grade students work on developing strategies that enable them to decode multi-syllable words and irregularly spelled words. Third graders also learn to identify words with affixes (prefixes and suffixes) and learn that affixes have meanings and can change the meanings of words to which they are attached. Third grade students learn to recognize common prefixes and inflectional and derivational suffixes and can explain how these common prefixes and suffixes change the meaning of a word. For example, they can explain that the prefix –un means not in the word unhappy.

Fluency:  Fluency is defined as being able to read orally with a reasonable rate of speed, with a high degree of accuracy, and with the proper expression (prosody). Fluency is one of several critical factors necessary for reading comprehension. 

Fluency changes, depending on what readers are reading, their familiarity with the words, and the amount of their practice with reading text. Even very skilled readers may read in a slow, labored manner when reading texts with many unfamiliar words or topics. For example, readers who are usually fluent may not be able to read technical material fluently, such as a textbook about nuclear physics or an article in a medical journal. 

How to help my child at home with the Foundational Skill Standards:

  • Help your child pick out words with prefixes and suffixes. Talk about how the prefix or suffix changed the meaning of the word.
  • If your child comes to a word he or she does not know, encourage them to use strategies such as looking for word parts (prefixes, suffixes)
  • Encourage your child to read many types of books.  Your child may also build fluency by reading the words to songs, poems, or speeches.
  • By reading with your child each night you are helping build his or her fluency! In fact, reading the same passages (and even their own writing) repeatedly gives your child an opportunity to listen, practice, and improve fluency.

 

Resources

Calculation Method for Strands

Strands are larger groups of related standards. The Strand Grade is a calculation of all the related standards. Click on the standard name below each strand to access the learning targets and proficiency scales for each strand's related standards.


ELA-03.RF.03

ELA Reading Foundations Strand Logo 3rd Grade (ELA) Targeted Standard
(RF) Strand: Reading Foundations/Skills
Cluster: Phonics and Word Recognition

ELA-03.RF.03 Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.

Sub-Standards:

a. Identify and know the meaning of the most common prefixes and derivational suffixes.
b. Decode words with common Latin suffixes.
c. Decode multi-syllable words.
d. Read grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words.

Student Learning Targets:

Knowledge Targets

  • I can define prefix and suffix.
  • I can identify common prefixes and suffixes (some examples: un-, re-, pre-, -er, -est, -ful).

Reasoning Targets

  • I can explain the meaning of common prefixes and suffixes and understand how they change the meaning of the root word.

Skills (Performance) Targets

  • I can determine the meaning of words with common Latin suffixes (some examples: -able, -ment, -tion).

Proficiency Scale

The student can ...
1 Beginning
... with help, demonstrates a partial understanding of some of the simpler details and processes (Score 2.0 content) and some of the more complex ideas and processes (Score 3.0 content).
... read and spell one and two syllable words with beginning and ending blends, common long and short vowel patterns in the beginning transitional reading stage.
2 Developing
... demonstrates no major errors or omissions regarding the simpler details and processes but exhibits major errors or omissions regarding the more complex ideas and processes (Score 3.0 content).
... read and spell multi-syllabic words and words with complex vowels and inflected endings (-ed, -ing) the middle transitional reading stage.
  • recognize or recall specific terminology, such as:
    • decode, syllable, multi-syllable, prefix, suffix, latin suffixes, irregularly, word meaning
  • perform basic processes, such as:
    • identify prefixes and suffixes
    • demonstrate sound-symbol correspondences for one syllable words
    • identify the number of syllables in a word
    • identify long and short vowel sounds in words.
3 Proficient
“The Standard.”
... demonstrates no major errors or omissions regarding any of the information and processes that were end of instruction expectations.
... read, sort and spell multi-syllabic words with common prefixes and suffixes and uses prefixes and suffixes to determine word meanings in text that is at the end of the transitional reading stage.
  • recognize and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words
    • (a) identify and know the meaning of the most common prefixes and derivational suffixes (re-, un-, dis-, mis-, pre-, -er, -est, -ly)
    • (b) decode words with common latin suffixes
    • (c) decode multisyllable words
    • (d) read grade-appropriate irregularly spelled word
4 Advanced
...demonstrates in-depth inferences and applications regarding more complex material that go beyond end of instruction expectations.
... read and spell words commonly found and used in text at the beginning fluent reading stage and uses word parts to determine meanings of words.
Teacher Proficiency Scale

Resources

Vocabulary

  • Prefix
  • Suffix
  • Word meaning
  • Decode
  • Syllable
  • Strategy

ELA-03.RF.04

ELA Reading Foundations Strand Logo 3rd Grade (ELA) Targeted Standard
(RF) Strand: Reading Foundations/Skills
Cluster: Fluency

ELA-04.RF.04 Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.

Sub-Standards:

a. Read grade level text with purpose and understanding.
b. Read grade level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.
c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.

Student Learning Targets:

Knowledge Targets

  • I can recognize when a word I read does not make sense within the text.

Reasoning Targets

  • I can

Skills (Performance) Targets

  • I can read grade-level text fluently and show comprehension through voice, timing and expression.
  • I can read fluently (with ease, sounding smooth and automatic).

Proficiency Scale

The student can ...
1 Beginning
... with help, demonstrates a partial understanding of some of the simpler details and processes (Score 2.0 content) and some of the more complex ideas and processes (Score 3.0 content).
... (reading) does not sound natural and reading is mostly word by word.
2 Developing
... demonstrates no major errors or omissions regarding the simpler details and processes but exhibits major errors or omissions regarding the more complex ideas and processes (Score 3.0 content).
... reads in two or three word phrases, and reading is starting to sound like talking.
  • recognize or recall specific terminology, such as:
    • expression, accuracy, rate, prose, poetry, text, context, fluency, purpose
  • perform basic processes, such as:
    • use teacher-directed fluency strategies*
    • recording and listening to self read
    • recognize need to self-correct
3 Proficient
“The Standard.”
... demonstrates no major errors or omissions regarding any of the information and processes that were end of instruction expectations.
... read text at the end of transitional reading stage with appropriate rate, accuracy. The student's reading sounds like conversation using longer phrases, paying attention to punctuation and quotation marks.
  • Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
    • (a) read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.
    • (b) read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.
    • (c) use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.
4 Advanced
... demonstrates in-depth inferences and applications regarding more complex material that go beyond end of instruction expectations.
... read text at the beginning fluent reading stage with appropriate rate, accuracy and using expressive interpretation and pausing, guided by the author's meaning and punctuation.
Teacher Proficiency Scale

Resources

Vocabulary

  • Fluency
  • Accuracy
  • Rate
  • Poetry
  • Prose
  • Expression

Websites

  • Links to sites that open in a new window
  • Poetry

ELA-03.RI

BPSS-ELA logoStrand (RI)

Reading Information

Narrative for Informational Reading Strand:

Informational text is designed to communicate factual information rather than to tell a narrative. Much of our daily reading is linked with this genre. Common examples of informational text include: diaries, cookbooks, websites, informational picture storybooks, field guides, and how-to books. 

Informational texts enable children to experience both language and content simultaneously, i.e., “read to learn.” The organization, graphic features, and writing styles found in informational texts are often content-specific. For example, the style of a biology textbook is quite different from a vacation guide. 

An important reading comprehension skill is the ability to determine the relative importance and precise meanings of words, sentences, paragraphs, sections, and chapters. Readers must be able to make sense of the meanings of words within sentences and of sentences within paragraphs. When readers grasp the main ideas, they better understand the purpose of the details—which, in turn, further strengthens their understanding of those main ideas. Readers, then, link their understanding of individual paragraphs to comprehend sections and chapters.

To feel successful across content areas students must read widely and deeply from among a broad range of high-quality, increasingly challenging informational texts. Through extensive reading of biographies and autobiographies; books about history, social studies, science, and the arts; technical texts, including directions, forms, and information displayed in graphs, charts, or maps; and digital sources on a range of topics students gain knowledge in various informational areas as well as familiarity with various text structures and elements. 

Continued work on reading comprehension standards will heighten student abilities to read more complex informational (nonfiction) text.  Teachers use assessment and observation to determine if students are ready to progress to more challenging reading selections.  Each child is unique, so be flexible, and trust your judgment as you assist your child.  Together teachers and parents can help students make better choices when selecting books to read.  Not all selections children read must be in the level suggested by assessment, these levels serve as a guideline.  Sometimes high interest in a topic allows success in a more difficult text, and sometimes simple text is more inviting to our children, balance is important.  Increasing the frequency of reading is the highest predictor of success at any grade level. Building a child’s confidence, through successful experiences with reading, will encourage that desire to read more. Developing successful, life-long readers is our ultimate goal.

 

 

How to Help Your Child At Home with the Informational Text Strand:

  • Ask questions about the topic being read (What does this book tell us about the solar system?)
  • Help your child dtermine the main idea of what they are reading, along with the details that support the main idea he/she stated
  • Have your child retell the information on the topic they read about
  • Re-read favorite books to build fluency, comprehension and confidence
  • Discuss the informational topics you read about
  • Bring attention to bold wordscaptions and  glossaries that will help locate key facts or information in a text
  • Discuss the text features in informational text (graphics, charts, diagrams)
  • Read magazines and newspapers for information and entertainment - the pictures and current event topics offer a high-interest way for readers to attemp more difficult reading than they may in a book
  • Read directions on packages, forms, games and recipes - this helps children see that we read many things to gain information
  • Make regular visits to a public library to select informational (non-fiction) reading material

 

Resources

Calculation Method for Strands

Strands are larger groups of related standards. The Strand Grade is a calculation of all the related standards. Click on the standard name below each strand to access the learning targets and proficiency scales for each strand's related standards.


ELA-03.RI.01

ELA Reading Informational Strand Logo 3rd Grade (ELA) Targeted Standard
(RI) Strand: Reading Informational/Nonfiction
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details

ELA-03.RI.01 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text (textual evidence), referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

Student Learning Targets:

Knowledge Targets

  • I can identify a key detail in an informational (non-fiction) text.

Reasoning Targets

  • I can use strategies to make sense of details presented in an informational (non-fiction) text.

Skills (Performance) Targets

  • I can locate words and details in an informational text (non-fiction) to answer questions in a text.
  • I can ask and answer questions before, during and after reading an informational text (non-fiction).

Proficiency Scale

The student can ...
1 Beginning
... with help, demonstrates a partial understanding of some of the simpler details and processes (Score 2.0 content) and some of the more complex ideas and processes (Score 3.0 content).
... demonstrate understanding of the text and includes main ideas when answering questions about the text.
2 Developing
... demonstrates no major errors or omissions regarding the simpler details and processes but exhibits major errors or omissions regarding the more complex ideas and processes (Score 3.0 content).
... demonstrate understanding by including main ideas and facts along with using text features when applicable to answer questions from a text.
  • recognize or recall specific terminology, such as:
    • question words (i.e. when, who, did, how, etc.), text, evidence, paragraph, explicit
  • perform basic processes, such as:
    • formulate a question
    • answer key detail questions about a text
    • locate evidence in the text that supports the answer to a question
3 Proficient
“The Standard.”
... demonstrates no major errors or omissions regarding any of the information and processes that were end of instruction expectations.
... demonstrate complete understanding of the text and includes important information and main ideas supported by text evidence when answering questions from a text at the end of the transitional reading stage.
  • ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text
  • refer explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers
4 Advanced
... demonstrates in-depth inferences and applications regarding more complex material that go beyond end of instruction expectations.
... summarize the information and support answers with text evidence-supporting his/her thinking and why he/she agrees or disagrees with the information, including key words and advanced vocabulary from a text at the beginning of the fluent reading stage.
Teacher Proficiency Scale

Resources

Vocabulary

  • Key details
  • Infer
  • Informational text

ELA-03.RI.02

ELA Reading Informational Strand Logo 3rd Grade (ELA) Targeted Standard
(RI) Strand: Reading Informational/Nonfiction
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details

ELA-03.RI.02 Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.

Student Learning Targets:

Knowledge Targets

  • I can define main idea (who or what a text is mostly about).
  • I can recount/retell (put into my own words) the key details of an informational (non-fiction) text.

Reasoning Targets

  • I can determine the main idea of a text.
  • I can identify key details in a text and explain how they support the main idea.

Skills (Performance) Targets

  • I can

Proficiency Scale

The student can ...
1 Beginning
... with help, demonstrates a partial understanding of some of the simpler details and processes (Score 2.0 content) and some of the more complex ideas and processes (Score 3.0 content).
... identify the main topic of a text and retell some of the important key details from events in the text.
2 Developing
... demonstrates no major errors or omissions regarding the simpler details and processes but exhibits major errors or omissions regarding the more complex ideas and processes (Score 3.0 content).
... state a main idea and supports it with some detail, although the details may not directly support the stated main idea.
  • recognize or recall specific terminology, such as:
    • main idea, retell, recount, key and supporting details, summary, topic, text evidence
  • perform basic processes, such as:
    • identify the topic of a nonfiction text
    • distinguish between a topic and a main idea
    • distinguish between key details versus supporting details
3 Proficient
“The Standard.”
... demonstrates no major errors or omissions regarding any of the information and processes that were end of instruction expectations.
... state a main ideas and explains how it is supported by the key details from a text at the end of the transitional reading stage.
  • determine the main idea of a text
  • recount the key details to explain how they support the main idea
4 Advanced
... demonstrates in-depth inferences and applications regarding more complex material that go beyond end of instruction expectations.
... summarize the text including important, specific details including key vocabulary and main ideas supported by specific text evidence from a text at the beginning fluent reading stage.
Teacher Proficiency Scale

Resources

Vocabulary

  • Main idea
  • Retell/recount
  • Key details
  • Summary
  • Topic

ELA-03.RL

BPSS-ELA logoStrand (RL)

Reading Literature

Narrative for Literature Strand:

Reading literature (fiction) allows students to learn about other lives and times that relate to their own personal experiences. In this strand, students will ask and answer questions about key details (characters, setting, plot), along with retelling what they have read.  Literature (fiction) helps readers learn important life lessons through the lives of the characters, comparing their own experiences with the experiences of the characters they read about. Reading literature (fiction) allows us to learn to appreciate the beauty of the language, and to be articulate speakers and writers.  

Before gaining deeper meanings, such as making logical inferences or drawing conclusions, readers must grasp the central details, characters, events, and ideas from the text.  importance of analyzing details and content that may be presented in a variety of formats. By drawing on the central details and facts of the text, skilled readers draw logical inferences and conclusions, or extend the themes of the present text to other literary settings. 

Third grade students must read widely and deeply from among a broad range of high-quality, increasingly literary texts. Through extensive reading of stories, dramas, poems, and myths from diverse cultures and different time periods, students gain literary and cultural knowledge as well as familiarity with various text structures and elements.

Continued work on reading comprehension standards will heighten student abilities to read more complex literature (fiction) text.  Teachers use assessment and observation to determine if students are ready to progress to more challenging reading selections.  Each child is unique, so be flexible, and trust your judgment as you assist your child.  Together teachers and parents can help students make better choices when selecting books to read.  Not all selections children read must be in the level suggested by assessment, these levels serve as a guideline.  Sometimes high interest in a topic allows success in a more difficult text, and sometimes simple text is more inviting to our children, balance is important.  Increasing the frequency of reading is the highest predictor of success at any grade level. Building a child’s confidence, through successful experiences with reading, will encourage that desire to read more. Developing successful, life-long readers is our ultimate goal.

 

How to Help Your Child At Home with the Literature Strand:

  • Read to your child often, and let him/her read books to you
  • Ask questions about what is being read  
  • Go beyond just naming the character and setting, have your child describe the characters and settings with details (ex. "What character traits did the characters have?" (kind, mean, creative, patient, messy)? How do you know?)
  • Have your child retell a story they have read with the beginning, middle and end
  • Allow your child to re-read favorite books to build fluency, comprehension and confidence
  • Discuss favorite stories together and talk about the characters and messages the author is trying to teach or lessons the characters learned in the story 
  • Don't forget - poetry can be a great read aloud
  • Make regular visits to a public library to select literature (fiction) reading material

 

Resources:

Calculation Method for Strands

Strands are larger groups of related standards. The Strand Grade is a calculation of all the related standards. Click on the standard name below each strand to access the learning targets and proficiency scales for each strand's related standards.


ELA-03.RL.01

ELA Reading Literature Strand Logo 3rd Grade (ELA) Targeted Standard
(RL) Strand: Reading Literature/Fiction
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details

ELA-03.RL.01 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

Student Learning Targets:

Knowledge Targets

  • I can identify a key detail from a text.

Reasoning Targets

  • I can use strategies to make sense of key ideas and details presented in the text.

Skills (Performance) Targets

  • I can locate words and details in the text to answer questions in a text.
  • I can ask and answer questions before, during, and after reading a text.

Proficiency Scale

The student can ...
1 Beginning
... with help, demonstrates a partial understanding of some of the simpler details and processes (Score 2.0 content) and some of the more complex ideas and processes (Score 3.0 content).
... show understanding of how the setting or details are important to the plot and the characters' perspectives as well as noticing evidence to show character attributes.
2 Developing
... demonstrates no major errors or omissions regarding the simpler details and processes but exhibits major errors or omissions regarding the more complex ideas and processes (Score 3.0 content).
... find clues in the story to support inferences about the character or setting and infers reasons for the character changing based on evidence in the text.
  • recognize or recall specific terminology, such as:
    • question words (i.e. when, who, did, how, etc.), text, evidence, paragraph, explicit
  • perform basic processes, such as:
    • formulate a question
    • identify story elements (character, setting, plot, problem, solution)
    • locate answers to questions in text
3 Proficient
“The Standard.”
... demonstrates no major errors or omissions regarding any of the information and processes that were end of instruction expectations.
... use specific text evidence such as the character's actions or dialogue to explain how the character responds or changes during a story, as well as using specific text evidence to support answers about the characters and setting of text at the end of the transitional reading stage.
  • ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text
  • refer explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers
4 Advanced
... demonstrates in-depth inferences and applications regarding more complex material that go beyond end of instruction expectations.
... infer character traits, feelings and motivations from what characters say, think or do and describe character attributes as revealed through dialogue and character behavior in texts that are at the beginning fluent stage.
Teacher Proficiency Scale

Resources

Vocabulary

  • Literary
  • Genre
  • Key Details
  • Traits
  • Infer
  • Describe/Description
  • Character Motivations

ELA-03.RL.02

ELA Reading Literature Strand Logo 3rd Grade (ELA) Targeted Standard
(RL) Strand: Reading Literature/Fiction
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details

ELA-03.RL.02 Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures to determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text.

Student Learning Targets:

Knowledge Targets

  • I can identify the beginning, middle and end of a story.
  • I can define what the overall idea or lesson the author is trying to share.

Reasoning Targets

  • I can explain the central message, lesson or moral (overall idea) using the key details from the story.

Skills (Performance) Targets

  • I can retell a story in my own words.

Proficiency Scale

The student can ...
1 Beginning
... with help, demonstrates a partial understanding of some of the simpler details and processes (Score 2.0 content) and some of the more complex ideas and processes (Score 3.0 content).
... give a general retell of the story with some details when prompted for further information about the text.
2 Developing
... demonstrates no major errors or omissions regarding the simpler details and processes but exhibits major errors or omissions regarding the more complex ideas and processes (Score 3.0 content).
... correctly recount the beginning, middle and end of the story, giving some details and naming events within the retelling of the story as well as stating a central message, theme or moral to the story.
  • recognize or recall specific terminology, such as:
    • recount, fables, folktales, myths, moral, central message, key details
  • perform basic processes, such as:
    • identify beginning, middle and end of stories
    • describe characters and their actions
    • identify key details in a text
    • identify common central messages, lessons, or morals
3 Proficient
“The Standard.”
... demonstrates no major errors or omissions regarding any of the information and processes that were end of instruction expectations.
... recount a story with specific details in a retelling and identifies a lesson or theme of a story providing evidence from a text at the end of the transitional reading stage.
  • recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures
  • determine central message, lesson, or moral
  • explain how the central message is conveyed through key details in the text
4 Advanced
... demonstrates in-depth inferences and applications regarding more complex material that go beyond end of instruction expectations.
... summarize the story including the important, specific details needed and includes a theme within the summary with specific evidence which supports the theme from text at the beginning fluent reading stage.
Teacher Proficiency Scale

Resources

Vocabulary

  • Key Details
  • Sequence
  • Author's Purpose
  • Important Events
  • Summary
  • Literary
  • Lesson/Moral
  • Recount/Retell

ELA-03.SL

BPSS-ELA logoStrand (SL)

Speaking and Listening

Narrative for the Speaking and Listening Strand

Speaking and listening standards require students to develop a range of oral communication and interpersonal skills that facilitate various types of discussion and oral exchange. Students must learn to work together, express and listen carefully to ideas, and integrate information from various sources, (e.g., oral, visual, quantitative, and media). Students must also gain skills in evaluating what they hear, use various sources to support what they are communicating, and adapt their speech to the content and the task at hand. 

Speaking and listening skills are necessary prerequisites for reading and writing. Oral language development precedes and is the foundation for writing. A student’s listening and speaking vocabulary sets boundaries on what that student can read and understand no matter how well they decode. In addition, new technologies have expanded the role speaking and listening play in acquiring and sharing ideas, tightening their link with other forms of communication.

 

How to help your child with the Speaking and Listening Standards:

  • At dinner time or in the car, have conversations with your child to allow him/her to practice the art of conversing with others
  • Respond to your child in sentences to model for him/her the correct way to talk
  • Ask for details about books, movies, and television shows you are viewing with your child
  • Ask your child to tell you in his/her own words about what he/she hears and sees
  • Encourage your child to describe his/her feelings and ideas in phrases and sentences that are more descriptive than just one word
  • Use complete sentences when you talk to your child and encourage him/her to speak in the same way

Resources

Calculation Method for Strands

Strands are larger groups of related standards. The Strand Grade is a calculation of all the related standards. Click on the standard name below each strand to access the learning targets and proficiency scales for each strand's related standards.



Page:  1  2  3  4  5  6  (Next)
  ALL